New to Navient

As your loan servicer, our goal is to help you stay on the path to successfully paying your student loans by keeping you informed about your loan with frequent correspondence and educational tools.

What to do before Repayment

Do you have federal student loans?

Use the Repayment Estimator on the FSA website to estimate monthly loan payments and evaluate repayment plan options.

Use FSA's Repayment Estimator

Get financially educated

Read our Financial Tips Blog, explore our Path to Success video series, and get valuable insights with The Career Playbook.

Go to Money & Finances

Repayment Options

Your student loan repayment options are different depending on the type of loan, the promissory note, and the lender.

Log in to explore your options

Managing Your Loans

Status Updates
We keep in touch with you throughout your repayment period and are here to answer any questions along the way.

Quarterly Interest Statement
While you're in school or during your grace period, we keep you apprised of your outstanding interest owed and your anticipated payment begin date.

Monthly Billing Statement
While you're in repayment, your billing statement will include your Monthly Payment Amount, Current Balance, and other important loan information. (Some customers may receive a coupon book instead of monthly billing statements.)

Experienced Customer Care
We're here to answer your questions, provide you with solutions, and process your payments.

Auto Pay
You can sign up to have your loan payments automatically deducted from your bank account. This may help reduce the interest rate on your eligible loans by 0.25%.*

Log In to Your Account

* To verify eligibility and the amount of your interest rate reduction, log in to your account and view your borrower benefits. If applicable, the interest rate reduction for Auto Pay will be available only while your monthly payment amount is successfully deducted from the designated bank account. This benefit is suspended during periods of forbearance and deferment, when monthly payments are not required.

In School?

If you have a Direct Subsidized federal student loan, the government generally does not charge interest on the loan while you’re in school.

If you have a Direct Unsubsidized federal student loan, you're responsible for paying the interest after it accrues — either in school, in grace, or in repayment.

If you can afford it, it's smart to make payments on your Direct Unsubsidized federal student loans while you're in school. This will lower your overall balance and potentially reduce the time you'll spend paying off your loan.

In Grace?

If you have a Direct Subsidized or Unsubsidized federal loan, your grace period lasts for 6 months. You must begin repaying your loan at the end of your 6-month grace period.

About 45 days prior to your payment start date, we'll provide you with a schedule of when your payments begin and your projected monthly payment amount.

If you have a Direct PLUS or Consolidation federal loan, there is no grace period. Payments begin immediately after the final loan disbursement is made.

Learn More on the FSA Website

Types of Federal Student Loans We Service

William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (Direct Loans)

Direct Loans are available to eligible undergraduate and graduate students to help cover the cost of higher education at a four-year college or university, community college, or trade, career, or technical school.
Lender: U.S. Department of Education

Direct Subsidized Loans – For undergraduate students, no interest is charged while you are in school at least half-time and during deferment periods. No interest is charged during the grace period for Direct Subsidized Loans disbursed prior to July 1, 2012 or after June 30, 2014.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans – For undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree students, interest is charged on unsubsidized loans during all periods.

Direct PLUS Loans for Parents – For parents of dependent undergraduate students, interest is charged during all periods. The parent is the primary borrower.

Direct PLUS Loans for Graduate Students – For graduate and professional degree students, interest is charged during all periods.

Direct Consolidation Loans – For borrowers who want to combine their eligible federal student loans into a single loan. No interest is charged on Direct Subsidized Consolidation Loans or Subsidized portions of Direct Consolidation Loans during deferment periods. Learn more about Direct Loan Consolidation

Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) (Discontinued)

Federal student loans made under the HEAL program, which was discontinued in 1998.

The Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) (Discontinued)

The FFELP program was discontinued on June 30, 2010. You may have FFELP loans if you borrowed before that date. The FFELP program offered federal student loans to students made by private lenders and insured by guaranty agencies.
Lender: A bank, credit union, finance company, non-profit, or state agency
Late fees: Assessed by most lenders (at lender discretion and subject to your loan's promissory note)

Federal Stafford Subsidized Loans – For undergraduate students, interest is paid on your behalf by the federal government while you are in school at least half-time and during grace or deferment periods.

Federal Stafford Unsubsidized Loans – For undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree students, interest is charged on unsubsidized loans during all periods.

FFELP PLUS Loans for Parents – For parents of dependent undergraduate students, interest is charged during all periods.

FFELP PLUS Loans for Graduate Students – For graduate and professional degree students, interest is charged during all periods.

FFELP Consolidation Loans – For borrowers who combined their eligible federal student loans into a single loan. Interest is paid on your behalf by the federal government on Subsidized portions of FFELP Consolidation Loans during deferment periods.

We Also Service Private Student Loans

Private loans are not funded by the federal government, but are made by banks, credit unions, or finance companies. They are primarily used to help students cover school costs above and beyond what can be covered with a federal loan.

Unlike federal loans, private loan eligibility requirements, interest rates, and terms vary from lender to lender.

For information about repaying private loans, refer to your private loans’ promissory notes, disclosures, and communications from your private loan servicer.

Lender: A bank, credit union, or finance company

Late fees: Assessed by most lenders

Key differences with private student loans when compared to federal loans include:

  • Payments may be required while you are in school and during grace/separation and deferment statuses.
  • Interest rates may be fixed or variable, and if it’s variable, it may change as often as monthly.
  • Private loans are not subsidized and interest is charged during all periods.
  • The vast majority of our private loans are qualified education loans for 1098-E reporting.
  • Private loan deferment and forbearance options may be limited.

Contact us to find out what options are available.


© 2018 Navient Solutions, LLC (NMLS #212430). All rights reserved.

Navient and the Navient logo are registered service marks of Navient Solutions, LLC. Navient Corporation and its subsidiaries, including Navient Solutions, LLC, are not sponsored by or agencies of the United States of America.